Tag Archives: Louisville Beer

HIP HOPS— Goodwood Brewing Co.

It is a deceptively simple notion to modify the flavor of beer by aging it in Bourbon barrels. Just as char and time transform simpler corn-based spirits into a sipper’s elixir, so a barrel’s second use with beer can create a characterful hybrid, balancing the chosen base beer with notes of vanilla and spices.

This principle holds true when using barrels previously filled with other liquors or wine, and to a more subtle extent, by exposing beer to various types of wood (most often oak) through chips or spirals. Continue reading HIP HOPS— Goodwood Brewing Co.

Hip Hops — Gordon Biersch: Still Leading with Lager

[Originally published in the F&D Fall 2015 issue]

Märzen, known as Oktoberfest in its autumnal guise, is an Old World style of lager beer originating in the German state of Bavaria.

Talk is cheap, so let’s have a sip — strictly for research purposes.

This Märzen is orange-tinged amber, with a rich, Continue reading Hip Hops — Gordon Biersch: Still Leading with Lager

Hip Hops: Louisville Beer Then and Now

“Anyone who has groped among the dark beer dungeons which lie for a number of deep streets under Phoenix Hill, would scarcely imagine while in those dark, chilly caves, that far above him the place would grow into such an efflorescence of beauty, fashion and brightness.”

From 1865 until 1919, Phoenix Hill Park was Louisville’s foremost beer garden, except that beer and sausages weren’t the only attractions. The park was a multi-tasking entertainment Mecca (or Munich), boasting a bandstand, bowling alley, dance hall, skating rink and velodrome, and even the fabled Hofbrauhaus itself never managed so many thirst-inducing brand extensions atop its lagering cellars. For a half century prior to the advent of Prohibition, Louisville was a town of brewing renown, and beer kept pace with bourbon in the popular imagination. It’s true that Prohibition smashed the tablets, but even without the villainy of legislated abstention, beer’s place in local culture would have changed with passing years, as norms brought to the area by German immigrants became exposed to the diffusion of the American melting pot. Continue reading Hip Hops: Louisville Beer Then and Now