Tipping

Tip pooling works really well when all parties cooperate.

You’ve likely heard that Doc Crow’s is being sued by a pair of former servers who say the restaurant forced them to participate in its tip pool, something that’s clearly against the law.

The “forced” part, that is. The law in Kentucky and in many other states says servers don’t have tip out if they don’t want to.

Fact is, the vast majority of them do because tip pooling provides a fair channel through which they can share their trips with front-of-the-house support staff, i.e. bartenders, food and drink runners and bussers.

Tip pools usually run hassle free. But sometimes servers refuse to share or the collections person skims a little off the top before passing out the remainder to the support team. Restaurant employees say that in either case, it’s not cool. Though in the servers’ case, it’s perfectly legal.

We’ve been cornered lots lately by industry outsiders who are trying to understand the whole issue. Some are quick to point the finger at one party or the other, calling them greedy or cheats or, again, not cool.

Thankfully, our online editor, Steve Coomes, took the time in a recent blog for Insider Louisville to detail how the process works. Read it to see the facts, and then judge who you think is right.

Click here to read more.